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Sick Leave Savings Account

In cases of serious illness or injury

Your paid time off (PTO) account provides the leave you need for occasional minor illnesses. But for those times when you or an immediate family member is more seriously ill or injured, your sick leave savings (SLS) account provides you with additional paid leave when you most need it. A serious illness or injury is defined as an illness, injury, impairment, or physical or mental condition, including those that:

  • Last for three or more days, requiring treatment by a health care provider
  • Require continued treatment from a health care provider
  • Require inpatient care

When should you use paid time off, and when is tapping into your sick leave savings account more appropriate?

Here are a few examples with scenarios to help illustrate the difference. Please note, PTO can be used in all the scenarios below in the event the employee does not have accrued hours in their sick leave savings account.

Andy

Flu

  • PTO: 380 hours
  • SLS: 1,170 hours
  • Diagnosed, out of work for 3+ days
  • Use SLS

Sheila

Sinus Infection

  • PTO: 80 hours
  • SLS: 1,170 hours
  • Out of work for 1 day
  • Use PTO

Corbin

Sick Child

  • PTO: 300 hours
  • SLS: 400 hours
  • Child has head cold, doctor recommends two days of rest
  • Use PTO

Stacey

Injury

  • PTO: 100 hours
  • SLS: 32 hours
  • Intermittent physical therapy appointments
  • Use SLS

Robert

Cancer Treatments

  • PTO: 200 hours
  • SLS: 130 hours
  • Intermittent appointments for treatments
  • Use SLS

As a supplement to Paid Family Leave

Hours accrued in the sick leave savings account may also be used to complement paid family leave, when appropriate:

  • For subsequent time away from work following eight weeks of UF Paid Family Leave (parental), up to a total away of six (6) months
  • For subsequent time away from work following eight weeks of UF Paid Family Leave (medical), pending medical certification from the employee’s medical provider or the medical provider of the immediate family member
  • During the 10-day waiting period required prior to accessing paid medical leave
  • In the event of a serious medical condition, as defined by the Family Medical Leave Act of 1993, in cases in which an employee is not eligible for UF Paid Family Leave