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Paid Time Off

A progressive approach to paid time off attuned to your needs

Coming Summer 2021

A paid time off model is a more modern approach that combines conventional sick and vacation leave pools. With this approach, UF is streamlining the process by enabling employees to flexibly use their time as they see fit.

This plan supplements and enables UF to provide a new Paid Family Leave (parental and medical) program launching in January 2021. Faculty and staff will also continue to enjoy 10 paid holidays and other leave benefits unique to the University of Florida.

Please note: While in-unit faculty members have negotiated to move to this paid time off plan in January 2021, other UF employees will move to a paid-time-off plan later in 2021, most likely over the summer.


Summary of changes coming in 2021


What is paid time off?

All accrued leave converts—no loss of existing accrued leave

Vacation and Sick Leave convert to Paid Time Off

10/12-Month Faculty and Staff accrue 10 hours PTO Bi-weekly.

  • All accrued vacation shifts to PTO
  • One time conversion of up to 80 hours of accrued sick leave shifts to PTO
  • 352-hour cap on PTO
  • Annually, any PTO over 352 moves into a sick leave savings account

9-Month Faculty/PK Yonge accrue 4 hours PTO Bi-weekly.

  • One time conversion of up to 80 hours of accrued sick leave shifts to PTO
  • 352-hour cap on PTO
  • Annually, any PTO over 352 moves into a sick leave savings account

Note: Employees who work less than full-time will accrue a pro-rated amount of PTO based on hours worked.

What is a sick leave savings account?

Your paid time off (PTO) account provides the leave you need for occasional minor illnesses. But for those times when you or an immediate family member is more seriously ill or injured, your sick leave savings (SLS) account provides you with additional paid leave when you most need it. A serious illness or injury is defined as an illness, injury, impairment, or physical or mental condition.

Read More about the Sick Leave Savings Account

What might leave conversion look like for you?

Below are two scenarios that illustrate what a conversion would look like for 1) a 10/12-month faculty or staff member, and 2) a 9-month faculty member or PK Yonge employee. Below these scenarios is a calculator you can use to estimate your own conversion.

Faculty and Staff Conversion Chart
9 Month Faculy/PK Yonge Conversion Chart

About this calculator

This calculator is for estimation purposes only. Actual conversion numbers may differ if you use or accrue leave between now and the conversion date.

Current Balances

Converted Balances

Paid Time-off: 0

Sick Leave Savings Account: 0

PTO Caps and Conversion

Faculty and TEAMS may carry a higher PTO balance throughout the year.

Any PTO hours over 352 (480 for faculty covered by the collective bargaining agreement) that are not used by the end of each calendar year will convert to your sick leave savings account.

Find your leave balances

To find your current leave balances, view your leave history in my.ufl.edu by following the path below:

Main Menu => My Self Service => Payroll and Compensation => UF Leave History


Planned vs Unplanned PTO

Planned PTO

Planned PTO is scheduled leave that is taken after approval is received from the employee’s immediate supervisor. Employees may use planned PTO for any personal reason including medical appointments.

Unplanned PTO

Unplanned PTO is unscheduled leave that is not pre-approved.


Town Hall

Your Questions Answered

Are we losing time off?
All leave will convert; there is no loss to your accrued leave balances. At the time we transition to PTO there will be a slight reduction (.769) in hours earned bi-weekly for those who earn annual/vacation. This reduction in hours allows us to provide an 8-week paid benefit to all faculty and staff in every stage of life.
How does this impact cash-out upon termination?
The amount of leave you are currently eligible to receive upon termination remains unchanged.
How is this time off model better than our existing structure of vacation and sick leave?
PTO provides employees with flexibility on how they use their leave. The focus is on when the time is taken off, not for what purpose, allowing for privacy or clarity about work status when engaged in approved outside activities. It also can help reduce unplanned absences.
How will the changes to leave affect my participation in DROP?
There will be no changes to DROP participation. There is no change to the current process that eligible TEAMS and Executive Service employees can cash out the pay plan’s maximum hours of 200 from PTO.
What are the caps on leave?
There is a 352-hour cap on the PTO balance. There is no hour’s cap on the Sick Leave Savings Account.
Will vacation leave over the cap of 352 rollover to sick leave at the end of this year like it normally does?
Yes, there will be no change to the current rollover process.
Is the new leave plan a use it or lose it?
There is no loss of hours in this conversion. Once an employee has a PTO balance of 352 hours, any accruals beyond that hour’s cap are moved to the Sick Leave Savings Account on an annual basis.
What is the difference between planned and unplanned?
Planned PTO is scheduled leave that is taken after approval is received from the employee’s immediate supervisor. Employees may use planned PTO for any personal reason including medical appointments. Unplanned PTO is unscheduled leave that is not pre-approved (for example, an employee calling in sick).
Will I be able to cashout PTO?
Yes. There are no changes to the cashout structure. A lifetime maximum of 200 PTO hours may be cashed out upon separation from the university.
Which “immediate” family definition will be used for the personal leave balances
We will use the UF definition of immediate family member. For the purpose of UF sick leave use and extended medical leaves of absence, the university’s definition for “immediate family” is defined as an employee’s spouse, domestic partner, great-grandparent, grandparent, parent, brother, sister, child, grandchild, or the grandparent, parent, brother, sister, child, grandchild, or great-grandchild of the employee’s spouse or domestic partner, or the spouse or domestic partner of any of them. This also includes individuals for whom the employee is the current legal guardian.